Grow More by Interplanting

This is the time of year when we apire to garden greatness. We look at our freshly turned soil, the rising temperatures, and the glorious plants and seeds on sale at our local garden centers. We usually manage to sneak off to a plant sale unsupervised at least once, and we come home with more plants than we have space. (We've all been there, right?) If you've accidentally bought more plants than your garden can hold for the umpteenth year in a row, maybe this post can help you out.

I maximize the space in each of my raised beds through a process called interplanting. Instead of dedicating separate precious square footage to spring crops and summer crops, I plant many of them alongside one another. It's pretty easy to do. 

Mature radishes surrounding a tomato seedling

Mature radishes surrounding a tomato seedling

Here are some ways you can interplant your garden:

An interplanted bed of peppers, lettuce, and pole beans

An interplanted bed of peppers, lettuce, and pole beans

  • Are you looking impatiently at the seedlings in your tomato bed, trying to hurry them along? It will be weeks before they really spread out, so utilize the real estate surrounding them for quick crops like radishes. I planted radishes among my tomato seedlings and zinnia seedlings. Right about the time that the tomatoes and zinnias start growing up and out rapidly, it's time for the radishes to be harvested. 
  • I also like to take advantage of shade provided by vertical-growing crops like pole beans. In this bed, I planted pole beans along one side and peppers along the others. It will be several weeks before the peppers really spread out, so right down the middle, I planted some lettuce seedlings. The lettuce will be kept cooler in the afternoon sun from the shade of my pole bean trellis. By the time the peppers start encroaching on the space in the middle of the bed, it will be time to harvest the lettuce. I also trained pole beans to climb up over my low tunnel hoops and planted kohlrabi underneath. Again, the shade from the pole beans will extend the growing season for the cool weather-loving kohlrabi. 
  • You can also interplant with flowers. This season, I planted two rows of cosmos seedlings into my raised beds. I knew it would be several weeks before they would take up the space in the middle, so I transplanted some sunflowers down the center. I've harvested the sunflowers, and the cosmos are just now flushing out. 
Sunflowers harvested from the interplanted bed (pictured behind) of cosmos.

Sunflowers harvested from the interplanted bed (pictured behind) of cosmos.

Make the most out of every nook and cranny by pairing slower growing summer crops with quick growing spring crops. 

How do you make the most of limited square footage? Do you have any interplanting tricks? Share them below! 

Happy growing, 

Mary Riddle

Zinnias and radishes

Zinnias and radishes